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Facebook's New Layout as of August, 2016

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Thursday, 04 August 2016 in social media

 

New Facebook layout

Facebook has been testing and has now rolled out a new business page layout. I first noticed it when I was logged into a client's Facebook account a couple of weeks ago in July. They were just showing the new look to a select audience because when I logged into my account, I was not seeing the new look quite yet.

Here are the changes that we see to the new Facebook look as of August 3rd, 2016:

1) The Facebook profile picture has moved to the top left and looks a little larger (thank goodness it's not blocking the Facebook cover image anymore!).

2) The Facebook cover image is now fully exposed! Designers will not have to worry about designing the Facebook cover image around any copy or profile pictures.

3) The information buttons, including about us, photos, videos, notes, etc. tabs are now to the left of the page, vs below the cover image.

4) The 'promote' button has moved to the bottom left under the information buttons.

5) The 'write something' for your business' status report is located in the middle of the page.

6) The Like, Message, More and call to action button such as 'Visit Website' are now more prominent and no longer crammed onto the bottom of the cover image (again, not blocking anything on the cover image). They are now located directly under the Facebook cover image.

7) The search button that was at the top of the page has been moved to the right under category, city, your average Facebook review, and the status of your business hours.

8) The Insights snapshot with post reach, the number of people that have clicked on your website, and the number of people that have clicked your call to action button is prominent in the top middle of the main timeline area.

9) The column that was on the left is now on the right hand side of the page and includes response rate, number of likes, check-ins, map, contact information, apps, photos, videos, upcoming events, notes and visitor posts.

BB FB

Overall, I like the new look. Facebook has to keep evolving and changing with so many other new social networks nipping at their heels. No doubt, there will be a backlash from users, but I personally think the new look will be easy to get use to. It will certainly keep our graphic designer busy  redesigning cover images to include images and copy where you would like now!

Tags: Array
0

Not only did Muhammad Ali know a thing or two about boxing, he was a champion of his brand, too. I instructed a class last week on ‘Making the Most Out of LinkedIn for Your Personal Brand.’ If LinkedIn were around when Muhammad Ali was in his prime, his description might read something like: ‘Self-proclaimed greatest boxer of all time. Entertaining audiences globally for over a decade.’ Well, you get the idea.

My LinkedIn branding class not only encouraged students to maximize all the categories LinkedIn offers to describe yourself, but also to provide a detailed, engaging, and yes, in some ways, entertaining description of you and your career. I reminded attendees that your online brand is the ‘first digital impression’ of you before someone meets you in person (or IRL=In Real Life) – and haven’t we all done an internet search on someone before we meet them, do business with them, or even accept their connection request on LinkedIn?

“Float Like a Butterfly…” Ali’s personal tag line is so well branded that I bet you can finish it without my help. Think about applying Ali’s branding techniques to your personal brand. Are you the best in your business? How can you convey, maybe in a more subtle way than Ali did, why someone should believe in you and your brand, want to get to know you better, or want to do business with you? Here are five things to think about to make the most out of your personal brand: 

1 – Think. Take a moment to think about what you want to be known for…. Got it? Now own it. If it’s not boxing (or maybe it is), what do you want people to think or say about you when you leave the room? For example: “He’s the most entertaining boxer I’ve ever seen and I would pay to see him again anytime!” Think about what you want people to say about you when you're not there.

2 – Craft. Next, now that you've thought about what you want to be known for, take time to create an authentic, descriptive, and again, maybe even entertaining, summary of yourself. Does it lead someone to want to read more about you? Does it summarize your successes? For example: “Olympic gold medal winner known for putting boxing on the map and dominating the spot for over two decades.” I immediately think – wow, how did he do that? I want to continue reading to find out!

3 – Be the Champ. Now that you have a winning summary of yourself, figure out what makes you different. What makes you the best at what you do? For example: “First man to win a heavyweight boxing title three times. Career-ending 56-5 record, with 37 knockouts, and lifetime earnings of $57 million.” Well, you don’t have to include your career earnings, but it sure sounded good in this example. Take the proverbial bull by the horns and own the title of best in your industry. Be prepared to prove it. Customer testimonials are a great way to help prove how good you are and they sound much better than you saying how fab you are – unless of course you are Muhammad Ali.

4 – Trail blaze. Now that you've figured out what makes you a champ, you need to share your forward-thinking ideas with others. Ali was known for speaking his mind (albeit a bit controversial at times), but I would encourage you to be a thought-leader in your industry. Take time each week to think about how you can help others – your customers and future customers – where your industry is headed, etc., and put it in writing. Start a blog, post it on your social networks, and even launch a podcast (read The Rising Popularity of Podcasting, and Why Your Business Should Care http://blogs.constantcontact.com/podcasting)

5 – Make a Difference. Lastly, highlight what are you doing to make the world a better place (ever heard of good karma?). Some of the students graduating from high school and college are so smart – over 4.0 GPA’s (don’t ask me how you earn over a 4.0 GPA, I preferred to socialize a bit more than study too hard – just ask my parents). What is going to be the tipping point of an employer when they are looking at two resumes with identical grades? Their social consciousness (and they have it - a 2014 millennial impact report showed 92% of millennials are contributing their creative skills to companies they feel are making a difference in the world). Find out what you are passionate about and donate your time, talents and/or treasures. Ali was an inspiration to the young, recognized for his race relations, humanitarianism, and standing up for what he believed in, even when the consequences were great. He fought for truth and justice. What will you fight for?

Let us know your thoughts on being the champ in your industry below!

b2ap3_thumbnail_cindy-flower-by-tree.jpg

 

 

 

Cindy Dalecki is owner of Marketing 2 Go, a social media, branding and marketing firm located in Palm Coast, Florida. 

Tags: Array
0

Using Video to Promote Your Business

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Sunday, 28 December 2014 in social media

They are watched for entertainment, and education, cooking tips and recipes, you can learn how to put something together (or take it apart), how to change your oil or change a diaper, movie trailers, and so much more. So why wouldn't you use video to promote your business? The answer is, you absolutely should be using video to further and strengthen your brand and company. I don't mean that you have to be in a video and talk about how great your company is, I mean you should utilize video the way you consume video. Here are five different ideas on how to get started using video for your business:

1. Stay out of it. Everyone knows that the best form of advertising is 'word of mouth' (WOM), so why not ask your customers to talk about how wonderful you are? A third party endorsement is better than anything you could say about how great you are. Tip: Hire someone to capture these videos for you since it may be awkward for someone to say how great you are to you. You will be pleasantly surprised what amazing things your fans say about you!

2. You are the pro. I know I just said ‘stay out of it’, but that was just one suggestion. Not only should promote what other 'experts' are saying in your industry, but if you are experienced at what you do, and consider yourself an expert, we recommend you share your knowledge with others. Remember, it's for the greater good of your business. Your goal is to create a reputation about your business as the industry experts. I'm not suggesting giving away trade secrets of course, but sharing answers to questions that you get all the time, or helpful or trending topics you read about in an industry magazine.

3. Promote your cause marketing. Cause marketing is aligning yourself with your favorite non-profit with the goal of positive, mutually beneficial results. This means, helping get the word out about your charity and their event, fundraiser, cause, mission, etc. In your effort to help them, people will inadvertently feel good about your business because they now see you as a business that cares about their community. And if you have a video about the non-profit, they are more likely to post it on their social networks (be sure to ask them to do so) and it will be exposed to their network of followers.

4. Ask fans to share a video of themselves using your product, or how they best utilize your service. Again, what better way to capture third party endorsements? Don’t forget to offer a prize to the most popular video.

woodys

5. Highlight your team. Ask select staff to introduce themselves and give a tip to your customers that will help them better utilize your products or services. Fans will enjoy seeing their favorite workers online and getting to know them before they do business with you. You or your team can also record short videos to promote upcoming events and provide a ‘behind the scenes’ look at your business.

What other ways have you successfully used video to reach out to your fans and potential new customers? We havehad success utilizing video for restaurants to promote events, heart-felt customer testimonials for a long-standing heating and air conditioning company, real estate agent branding campaigns and more.

Tags: Array
0

It's one of the biggest fears our potential clients (notice, they are not social media clients yet), and a reason that many county and city decision makers, business owners and managers do not take the necessary leap into social media...because someone could write something negative about my business on there! Well, guess what, they very well may be doing it already and you have no control over it and worse yet, don't know that it's out there...lurking...waiting to haunt you...(Halloween is next week you know).

Ask yourself this, wouldn't it be better to have the ability to hear from an uphappy customer, be able to respond publically to them, and finally, make it better? You know your business best so think about this: In the past, what have been some of the complaints about your busienss? Have you been able to fix them? We are guessing you have. And I am willing to bet that some of those clients  that originally were unhappy about (probably) something silly, and you paid them extra attenion, fixed it, and maybe even made it better, are one of your best word-of-mouth (WOM) promoters now. 

I organized an entrepreneur panel for the Flagler County Chamber of Commerce breakfast last year. One of the audience members asked the question: "How do you avoid someone posting something negative on your page". One of the panel member’s answer was priceless: "Be fabulous at what you do and you don't have to worry about that so much" (props to Kayhan Ekinci at Office Divvy). Yes, if you provide exceptional customer service, it's true that the likelihood of negative comments goes way down. But in reality, we know that you can't please everyone, all the time (some people are clinically off their meds, we understand). So what do you do? 

#1 - Monitor what is being said about you or your business. Set up Google alerts (or something similar), if you are a local business, for goodness sake, read or subscribe to the online version of the newspaper (there's nothing worse than someone saying - did you see that article? You didn’t and it was about you!).

#2 - Respond immediately. If you are a restaurant and it’s a complaint about service, find out who was working and get their side of the story (the truth will be in the middle somewhere). Take the conversation off-line. Provide your phone number and assure the customer that you are committed to ensuring their satisfaction. Be sure to provide a solid solution. IE: I am the manger and will be there at 11am – 9pm and I look forward to taking your call, or please message us your phone number and we will contact you asap – and do it! 

#3 – Do not remove the post. It’s a knee-jerk reaction and we all want to do it. You are mad and you probably want to hide it from all of your other customers that love you. But, sometimes if your customers that love you see it, this can work in your favor. How? Because they LOVE you and will have a hard time believing that you could do any wrong. And our favorites are the ones that are not shy about saying it publically. We had a complaint about the ‘high’ price of a fish sandwich on a restaurant client’s page. We saw it and responded nicely about quality ingredients, etc., etc. Shortly thereafter, several posts following it from some of their fans, in summary, said ‘you get what you pay for and if you don’t like it, go down the street to Burger King and get yourself a .99 fish sandwich. We didn’t say (although we may have been thinking it), it was our customers.

#4 – You may have to delete and ban a user. If you have tried all of the above, and they are relentlessly posting negative feedback (and maybe even using profanity), and you are confident that even if you offered them a million dollars and a stake in your company, they wouldn’t stop, then delete their post and ban them. That’s right, I said it, get rid of them! We had to do it with someone that, with a little research, found out that he was a serial negative poster about many things, and he was also a professional con-artist (with some pending law suits). He was just interested in what he could get for free. And in the end, he got nothing.

Tell us about your best or worse negative social media post. Did you convert the customer to one of your biggest fans, or did you ban them for eternity?

Tags: Array
0

Twitter's New Layout - April 2014

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 12 April 2014 in social media

The Top 3 Things to Know About Twitter's New Layout

Plus more!

Yes, it looks very similar to Facebook, which many new and future Twitter users may like. The jury is still out on what frequent Twitter users think, they may not like the 'commercialization' of the new look, a quick Google search, and you will find a lot of blogs talking about it (like this one!). When we speak to business owners, many are not sure how Twitter works or what a hashtag (#) is used for, so I think this new, familiar look will help potential users feel more comfortable using the site.

The major differences:

1. Large cover image at the top vs a smaller header for picture - 1,500 x 500 pixels wide vs 1252 x 626. Yes, you will need to create a new image otherwise, it will look stretched.

twitter copy

2. More popular tweets are a larger font to make it easy for your followers to see and find vs the same font for every tweet

mo

3. Larger profile images vs all the same size

Larger Twitter pictures

Some other notible Twitter changes:

  • Pin Tweets: You can now "Pin" a tweet (again, similar to Facebook). Just click on the More menu in every tweet (those three dots), and select "Pin to your profile page".
  • "Who to Follow" and "Trends" have moved to the lower right. The popular "trends" list has moved to the bottom right side of your Twitter profile (use to be on the left side).
  • Twitter's "Edit Profile" screen is completely new and improved from previous versions.
  • See detailed description of who you’re following on Twitter, you will see a tiled board (similar to Pinterest) that includes not only the names of everyone you’re following but their profile picture, header photo and bio.
  • The menu of Tweets, Following, Followers, Favorites and Lists are gone. When you post a photo or video, the small checkerboard square of media elements will reappear below your profile picture and description.
  • Twitter will now have pop-up notifications in your web browser anytime someone has replied to, favorited or retweeted one of your tweets while you’re logged into Twitter.com.

Let us know what you think of Twitter's new redesign. Do you like everything? Do you like a few things? Do you like it all?

Tags: Array
0

New Facebook Insight's Changes

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 13 July 2013 in social media
Tags: Array
0

Facebook's New Layout as of August, 2016

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Thursday, 04 August 2016 in social media

 

New Facebook layout

Facebook has been testing and has now rolled out a new business page layout. I first noticed it when I was logged into a client's Facebook account a couple of weeks ago in July. They were just showing the new look to a select audience because when I logged into my account, I was not seeing the new look quite yet.

Here are the changes that we see to the new Facebook look as of August 3rd, 2016:

1) The Facebook profile picture has moved to the top left and looks a little larger (thank goodness it's not blocking the Facebook cover image anymore!).

2) The Facebook cover image is now fully exposed! Designers will not have to worry about designing the Facebook cover image around any copy or profile pictures.

3) The information buttons, including about us, photos, videos, notes, etc. tabs are now to the left of the page, vs below the cover image.

4) The 'promote' button has moved to the bottom left under the information buttons.

5) The 'write something' for your business' status report is located in the middle of the page.

6) The Like, Message, More and call to action button such as 'Visit Website' are now more prominent and no longer crammed onto the bottom of the cover image (again, not blocking anything on the cover image). They are now located directly under the Facebook cover image.

7) The search button that was at the top of the page has been moved to the right under category, city, your average Facebook review, and the status of your business hours.

8) The Insights snapshot with post reach, the number of people that have clicked on your website, and the number of people that have clicked your call to action button is prominent in the top middle of the main timeline area.

9) The column that was on the left is now on the right hand side of the page and includes response rate, number of likes, check-ins, map, contact information, apps, photos, videos, upcoming events, notes and visitor posts.

BB FB

Overall, I like the new look. Facebook has to keep evolving and changing with so many other new social networks nipping at their heels. No doubt, there will be a backlash from users, but I personally think the new look will be easy to get use to. It will certainly keep our graphic designer busy  redesigning cover images to include images and copy where you would like now!

Tags: Array
0

Not only did Muhammad Ali know a thing or two about boxing, he was a champion of his brand, too. I instructed a class last week on ‘Making the Most Out of LinkedIn for Your Personal Brand.’ If LinkedIn were around when Muhammad Ali was in his prime, his description might read something like: ‘Self-proclaimed greatest boxer of all time. Entertaining audiences globally for over a decade.’ Well, you get the idea.

My LinkedIn branding class not only encouraged students to maximize all the categories LinkedIn offers to describe yourself, but also to provide a detailed, engaging, and yes, in some ways, entertaining description of you and your career. I reminded attendees that your online brand is the ‘first digital impression’ of you before someone meets you in person (or IRL=In Real Life) – and haven’t we all done an internet search on someone before we meet them, do business with them, or even accept their connection request on LinkedIn?

“Float Like a Butterfly…” Ali’s personal tag line is so well branded that I bet you can finish it without my help. Think about applying Ali’s branding techniques to your personal brand. Are you the best in your business? How can you convey, maybe in a more subtle way than Ali did, why someone should believe in you and your brand, want to get to know you better, or want to do business with you? Here are five things to think about to make the most out of your personal brand: 

1 – Think. Take a moment to think about what you want to be known for…. Got it? Now own it. If it’s not boxing (or maybe it is), what do you want people to think or say about you when you leave the room? For example: “He’s the most entertaining boxer I’ve ever seen and I would pay to see him again anytime!” Think about what you want people to say about you when you're not there.

2 – Craft. Next, now that you've thought about what you want to be known for, take time to create an authentic, descriptive, and again, maybe even entertaining, summary of yourself. Does it lead someone to want to read more about you? Does it summarize your successes? For example: “Olympic gold medal winner known for putting boxing on the map and dominating the spot for over two decades.” I immediately think – wow, how did he do that? I want to continue reading to find out!

3 – Be the Champ. Now that you have a winning summary of yourself, figure out what makes you different. What makes you the best at what you do? For example: “First man to win a heavyweight boxing title three times. Career-ending 56-5 record, with 37 knockouts, and lifetime earnings of $57 million.” Well, you don’t have to include your career earnings, but it sure sounded good in this example. Take the proverbial bull by the horns and own the title of best in your industry. Be prepared to prove it. Customer testimonials are a great way to help prove how good you are and they sound much better than you saying how fab you are – unless of course you are Muhammad Ali.

4 – Trail blaze. Now that you've figured out what makes you a champ, you need to share your forward-thinking ideas with others. Ali was known for speaking his mind (albeit a bit controversial at times), but I would encourage you to be a thought-leader in your industry. Take time each week to think about how you can help others – your customers and future customers – where your industry is headed, etc., and put it in writing. Start a blog, post it on your social networks, and even launch a podcast (read The Rising Popularity of Podcasting, and Why Your Business Should Care http://blogs.constantcontact.com/podcasting)

5 – Make a Difference. Lastly, highlight what are you doing to make the world a better place (ever heard of good karma?). Some of the students graduating from high school and college are so smart – over 4.0 GPA’s (don’t ask me how you earn over a 4.0 GPA, I preferred to socialize a bit more than study too hard – just ask my parents). What is going to be the tipping point of an employer when they are looking at two resumes with identical grades? Their social consciousness (and they have it - a 2014 millennial impact report showed 92% of millennials are contributing their creative skills to companies they feel are making a difference in the world). Find out what you are passionate about and donate your time, talents and/or treasures. Ali was an inspiration to the young, recognized for his race relations, humanitarianism, and standing up for what he believed in, even when the consequences were great. He fought for truth and justice. What will you fight for?

Let us know your thoughts on being the champ in your industry below!

b2ap3_thumbnail_cindy-flower-by-tree.jpg

 

 

 

Cindy Dalecki is owner of Marketing 2 Go, a social media, branding and marketing firm located in Palm Coast, Florida. 

Tags: Array
0

Using Video to Promote Your Business

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Sunday, 28 December 2014 in social media

They are watched for entertainment, and education, cooking tips and recipes, you can learn how to put something together (or take it apart), how to change your oil or change a diaper, movie trailers, and so much more. So why wouldn't you use video to promote your business? The answer is, you absolutely should be using video to further and strengthen your brand and company. I don't mean that you have to be in a video and talk about how great your company is, I mean you should utilize video the way you consume video. Here are five different ideas on how to get started using video for your business:

1. Stay out of it. Everyone knows that the best form of advertising is 'word of mouth' (WOM), so why not ask your customers to talk about how wonderful you are? A third party endorsement is better than anything you could say about how great you are. Tip: Hire someone to capture these videos for you since it may be awkward for someone to say how great you are to you. You will be pleasantly surprised what amazing things your fans say about you!

2. You are the pro. I know I just said ‘stay out of it’, but that was just one suggestion. Not only should promote what other 'experts' are saying in your industry, but if you are experienced at what you do, and consider yourself an expert, we recommend you share your knowledge with others. Remember, it's for the greater good of your business. Your goal is to create a reputation about your business as the industry experts. I'm not suggesting giving away trade secrets of course, but sharing answers to questions that you get all the time, or helpful or trending topics you read about in an industry magazine.

3. Promote your cause marketing. Cause marketing is aligning yourself with your favorite non-profit with the goal of positive, mutually beneficial results. This means, helping get the word out about your charity and their event, fundraiser, cause, mission, etc. In your effort to help them, people will inadvertently feel good about your business because they now see you as a business that cares about their community. And if you have a video about the non-profit, they are more likely to post it on their social networks (be sure to ask them to do so) and it will be exposed to their network of followers.

4. Ask fans to share a video of themselves using your product, or how they best utilize your service. Again, what better way to capture third party endorsements? Don’t forget to offer a prize to the most popular video.

woodys

5. Highlight your team. Ask select staff to introduce themselves and give a tip to your customers that will help them better utilize your products or services. Fans will enjoy seeing their favorite workers online and getting to know them before they do business with you. You or your team can also record short videos to promote upcoming events and provide a ‘behind the scenes’ look at your business.

What other ways have you successfully used video to reach out to your fans and potential new customers? We havehad success utilizing video for restaurants to promote events, heart-felt customer testimonials for a long-standing heating and air conditioning company, real estate agent branding campaigns and more.

Tags: Array
0

It's one of the biggest fears our potential clients (notice, they are not social media clients yet), and a reason that many county and city decision makers, business owners and managers do not take the necessary leap into social media...because someone could write something negative about my business on there! Well, guess what, they very well may be doing it already and you have no control over it and worse yet, don't know that it's out there...lurking...waiting to haunt you...(Halloween is next week you know).

Ask yourself this, wouldn't it be better to have the ability to hear from an uphappy customer, be able to respond publically to them, and finally, make it better? You know your business best so think about this: In the past, what have been some of the complaints about your busienss? Have you been able to fix them? We are guessing you have. And I am willing to bet that some of those clients  that originally were unhappy about (probably) something silly, and you paid them extra attenion, fixed it, and maybe even made it better, are one of your best word-of-mouth (WOM) promoters now. 

I organized an entrepreneur panel for the Flagler County Chamber of Commerce breakfast last year. One of the audience members asked the question: "How do you avoid someone posting something negative on your page". One of the panel member’s answer was priceless: "Be fabulous at what you do and you don't have to worry about that so much" (props to Kayhan Ekinci at Office Divvy). Yes, if you provide exceptional customer service, it's true that the likelihood of negative comments goes way down. But in reality, we know that you can't please everyone, all the time (some people are clinically off their meds, we understand). So what do you do? 

#1 - Monitor what is being said about you or your business. Set up Google alerts (or something similar), if you are a local business, for goodness sake, read or subscribe to the online version of the newspaper (there's nothing worse than someone saying - did you see that article? You didn’t and it was about you!).

#2 - Respond immediately. If you are a restaurant and it’s a complaint about service, find out who was working and get their side of the story (the truth will be in the middle somewhere). Take the conversation off-line. Provide your phone number and assure the customer that you are committed to ensuring their satisfaction. Be sure to provide a solid solution. IE: I am the manger and will be there at 11am – 9pm and I look forward to taking your call, or please message us your phone number and we will contact you asap – and do it! 

#3 – Do not remove the post. It’s a knee-jerk reaction and we all want to do it. You are mad and you probably want to hide it from all of your other customers that love you. But, sometimes if your customers that love you see it, this can work in your favor. How? Because they LOVE you and will have a hard time believing that you could do any wrong. And our favorites are the ones that are not shy about saying it publically. We had a complaint about the ‘high’ price of a fish sandwich on a restaurant client’s page. We saw it and responded nicely about quality ingredients, etc., etc. Shortly thereafter, several posts following it from some of their fans, in summary, said ‘you get what you pay for and if you don’t like it, go down the street to Burger King and get yourself a .99 fish sandwich. We didn’t say (although we may have been thinking it), it was our customers.

#4 – You may have to delete and ban a user. If you have tried all of the above, and they are relentlessly posting negative feedback (and maybe even using profanity), and you are confident that even if you offered them a million dollars and a stake in your company, they wouldn’t stop, then delete their post and ban them. That’s right, I said it, get rid of them! We had to do it with someone that, with a little research, found out that he was a serial negative poster about many things, and he was also a professional con-artist (with some pending law suits). He was just interested in what he could get for free. And in the end, he got nothing.

Tell us about your best or worse negative social media post. Did you convert the customer to one of your biggest fans, or did you ban them for eternity?

Tags: Array
0

Twitter's New Layout - April 2014

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 12 April 2014 in social media

The Top 3 Things to Know About Twitter's New Layout

Plus more!

Yes, it looks very similar to Facebook, which many new and future Twitter users may like. The jury is still out on what frequent Twitter users think, they may not like the 'commercialization' of the new look, a quick Google search, and you will find a lot of blogs talking about it (like this one!). When we speak to business owners, many are not sure how Twitter works or what a hashtag (#) is used for, so I think this new, familiar look will help potential users feel more comfortable using the site.

The major differences:

1. Large cover image at the top vs a smaller header for picture - 1,500 x 500 pixels wide vs 1252 x 626. Yes, you will need to create a new image otherwise, it will look stretched.

twitter copy

2. More popular tweets are a larger font to make it easy for your followers to see and find vs the same font for every tweet

mo

3. Larger profile images vs all the same size

Larger Twitter pictures

Some other notible Twitter changes:

  • Pin Tweets: You can now "Pin" a tweet (again, similar to Facebook). Just click on the More menu in every tweet (those three dots), and select "Pin to your profile page".
  • "Who to Follow" and "Trends" have moved to the lower right. The popular "trends" list has moved to the bottom right side of your Twitter profile (use to be on the left side).
  • Twitter's "Edit Profile" screen is completely new and improved from previous versions.
  • See detailed description of who you’re following on Twitter, you will see a tiled board (similar to Pinterest) that includes not only the names of everyone you’re following but their profile picture, header photo and bio.
  • The menu of Tweets, Following, Followers, Favorites and Lists are gone. When you post a photo or video, the small checkerboard square of media elements will reappear below your profile picture and description.
  • Twitter will now have pop-up notifications in your web browser anytime someone has replied to, favorited or retweeted one of your tweets while you’re logged into Twitter.com.

Let us know what you think of Twitter's new redesign. Do you like everything? Do you like a few things? Do you like it all?

Tags: Array
0

New Facebook Insight's Changes

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 13 July 2013 in social media
Tags: Array
0

Facebook's New Layout as of August, 2016

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Thursday, 04 August 2016 in social media

 

New Facebook layout

Facebook has been testing and has now rolled out a new business page layout. I first noticed it when I was logged into a client's Facebook account a couple of weeks ago in July. They were just showing the new look to a select audience because when I logged into my account, I was not seeing the new look quite yet.

Here are the changes that we see to the new Facebook look as of August 3rd, 2016:

1) The Facebook profile picture has moved to the top left and looks a little larger (thank goodness it's not blocking the Facebook cover image anymore!).

2) The Facebook cover image is now fully exposed! Designers will not have to worry about designing the Facebook cover image around any copy or profile pictures.

3) The information buttons, including about us, photos, videos, notes, etc. tabs are now to the left of the page, vs below the cover image.

4) The 'promote' button has moved to the bottom left under the information buttons.

5) The 'write something' for your business' status report is located in the middle of the page.

6) The Like, Message, More and call to action button such as 'Visit Website' are now more prominent and no longer crammed onto the bottom of the cover image (again, not blocking anything on the cover image). They are now located directly under the Facebook cover image.

7) The search button that was at the top of the page has been moved to the right under category, city, your average Facebook review, and the status of your business hours.

8) The Insights snapshot with post reach, the number of people that have clicked on your website, and the number of people that have clicked your call to action button is prominent in the top middle of the main timeline area.

9) The column that was on the left is now on the right hand side of the page and includes response rate, number of likes, check-ins, map, contact information, apps, photos, videos, upcoming events, notes and visitor posts.

BB FB

Overall, I like the new look. Facebook has to keep evolving and changing with so many other new social networks nipping at their heels. No doubt, there will be a backlash from users, but I personally think the new look will be easy to get use to. It will certainly keep our graphic designer busy  redesigning cover images to include images and copy where you would like now!

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0

Not only did Muhammad Ali know a thing or two about boxing, he was a champion of his brand, too. I instructed a class last week on ‘Making the Most Out of LinkedIn for Your Personal Brand.’ If LinkedIn were around when Muhammad Ali was in his prime, his description might read something like: ‘Self-proclaimed greatest boxer of all time. Entertaining audiences globally for over a decade.’ Well, you get the idea.

My LinkedIn branding class not only encouraged students to maximize all the categories LinkedIn offers to describe yourself, but also to provide a detailed, engaging, and yes, in some ways, entertaining description of you and your career. I reminded attendees that your online brand is the ‘first digital impression’ of you before someone meets you in person (or IRL=In Real Life) – and haven’t we all done an internet search on someone before we meet them, do business with them, or even accept their connection request on LinkedIn?

“Float Like a Butterfly…” Ali’s personal tag line is so well branded that I bet you can finish it without my help. Think about applying Ali’s branding techniques to your personal brand. Are you the best in your business? How can you convey, maybe in a more subtle way than Ali did, why someone should believe in you and your brand, want to get to know you better, or want to do business with you? Here are five things to think about to make the most out of your personal brand: 

1 – Think. Take a moment to think about what you want to be known for…. Got it? Now own it. If it’s not boxing (or maybe it is), what do you want people to think or say about you when you leave the room? For example: “He’s the most entertaining boxer I’ve ever seen and I would pay to see him again anytime!” Think about what you want people to say about you when you're not there.

2 – Craft. Next, now that you've thought about what you want to be known for, take time to create an authentic, descriptive, and again, maybe even entertaining, summary of yourself. Does it lead someone to want to read more about you? Does it summarize your successes? For example: “Olympic gold medal winner known for putting boxing on the map and dominating the spot for over two decades.” I immediately think – wow, how did he do that? I want to continue reading to find out!

3 – Be the Champ. Now that you have a winning summary of yourself, figure out what makes you different. What makes you the best at what you do? For example: “First man to win a heavyweight boxing title three times. Career-ending 56-5 record, with 37 knockouts, and lifetime earnings of $57 million.” Well, you don’t have to include your career earnings, but it sure sounded good in this example. Take the proverbial bull by the horns and own the title of best in your industry. Be prepared to prove it. Customer testimonials are a great way to help prove how good you are and they sound much better than you saying how fab you are – unless of course you are Muhammad Ali.

4 – Trail blaze. Now that you've figured out what makes you a champ, you need to share your forward-thinking ideas with others. Ali was known for speaking his mind (albeit a bit controversial at times), but I would encourage you to be a thought-leader in your industry. Take time each week to think about how you can help others – your customers and future customers – where your industry is headed, etc., and put it in writing. Start a blog, post it on your social networks, and even launch a podcast (read The Rising Popularity of Podcasting, and Why Your Business Should Care http://blogs.constantcontact.com/podcasting)

5 – Make a Difference. Lastly, highlight what are you doing to make the world a better place (ever heard of good karma?). Some of the students graduating from high school and college are so smart – over 4.0 GPA’s (don’t ask me how you earn over a 4.0 GPA, I preferred to socialize a bit more than study too hard – just ask my parents). What is going to be the tipping point of an employer when they are looking at two resumes with identical grades? Their social consciousness (and they have it - a 2014 millennial impact report showed 92% of millennials are contributing their creative skills to companies they feel are making a difference in the world). Find out what you are passionate about and donate your time, talents and/or treasures. Ali was an inspiration to the young, recognized for his race relations, humanitarianism, and standing up for what he believed in, even when the consequences were great. He fought for truth and justice. What will you fight for?

Let us know your thoughts on being the champ in your industry below!

b2ap3_thumbnail_cindy-flower-by-tree.jpg

 

 

 

Cindy Dalecki is owner of Marketing 2 Go, a social media, branding and marketing firm located in Palm Coast, Florida. 

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0

Using Video to Promote Your Business

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Sunday, 28 December 2014 in social media

They are watched for entertainment, and education, cooking tips and recipes, you can learn how to put something together (or take it apart), how to change your oil or change a diaper, movie trailers, and so much more. So why wouldn't you use video to promote your business? The answer is, you absolutely should be using video to further and strengthen your brand and company. I don't mean that you have to be in a video and talk about how great your company is, I mean you should utilize video the way you consume video. Here are five different ideas on how to get started using video for your business:

1. Stay out of it. Everyone knows that the best form of advertising is 'word of mouth' (WOM), so why not ask your customers to talk about how wonderful you are? A third party endorsement is better than anything you could say about how great you are. Tip: Hire someone to capture these videos for you since it may be awkward for someone to say how great you are to you. You will be pleasantly surprised what amazing things your fans say about you!

2. You are the pro. I know I just said ‘stay out of it’, but that was just one suggestion. Not only should promote what other 'experts' are saying in your industry, but if you are experienced at what you do, and consider yourself an expert, we recommend you share your knowledge with others. Remember, it's for the greater good of your business. Your goal is to create a reputation about your business as the industry experts. I'm not suggesting giving away trade secrets of course, but sharing answers to questions that you get all the time, or helpful or trending topics you read about in an industry magazine.

3. Promote your cause marketing. Cause marketing is aligning yourself with your favorite non-profit with the goal of positive, mutually beneficial results. This means, helping get the word out about your charity and their event, fundraiser, cause, mission, etc. In your effort to help them, people will inadvertently feel good about your business because they now see you as a business that cares about their community. And if you have a video about the non-profit, they are more likely to post it on their social networks (be sure to ask them to do so) and it will be exposed to their network of followers.

4. Ask fans to share a video of themselves using your product, or how they best utilize your service. Again, what better way to capture third party endorsements? Don’t forget to offer a prize to the most popular video.

woodys

5. Highlight your team. Ask select staff to introduce themselves and give a tip to your customers that will help them better utilize your products or services. Fans will enjoy seeing their favorite workers online and getting to know them before they do business with you. You or your team can also record short videos to promote upcoming events and provide a ‘behind the scenes’ look at your business.

What other ways have you successfully used video to reach out to your fans and potential new customers? We havehad success utilizing video for restaurants to promote events, heart-felt customer testimonials for a long-standing heating and air conditioning company, real estate agent branding campaigns and more.

Tags: Array
0

It's one of the biggest fears our potential clients (notice, they are not social media clients yet), and a reason that many county and city decision makers, business owners and managers do not take the necessary leap into social media...because someone could write something negative about my business on there! Well, guess what, they very well may be doing it already and you have no control over it and worse yet, don't know that it's out there...lurking...waiting to haunt you...(Halloween is next week you know).

Ask yourself this, wouldn't it be better to have the ability to hear from an uphappy customer, be able to respond publically to them, and finally, make it better? You know your business best so think about this: In the past, what have been some of the complaints about your busienss? Have you been able to fix them? We are guessing you have. And I am willing to bet that some of those clients  that originally were unhappy about (probably) something silly, and you paid them extra attenion, fixed it, and maybe even made it better, are one of your best word-of-mouth (WOM) promoters now. 

I organized an entrepreneur panel for the Flagler County Chamber of Commerce breakfast last year. One of the audience members asked the question: "How do you avoid someone posting something negative on your page". One of the panel member’s answer was priceless: "Be fabulous at what you do and you don't have to worry about that so much" (props to Kayhan Ekinci at Office Divvy). Yes, if you provide exceptional customer service, it's true that the likelihood of negative comments goes way down. But in reality, we know that you can't please everyone, all the time (some people are clinically off their meds, we understand). So what do you do? 

#1 - Monitor what is being said about you or your business. Set up Google alerts (or something similar), if you are a local business, for goodness sake, read or subscribe to the online version of the newspaper (there's nothing worse than someone saying - did you see that article? You didn’t and it was about you!).

#2 - Respond immediately. If you are a restaurant and it’s a complaint about service, find out who was working and get their side of the story (the truth will be in the middle somewhere). Take the conversation off-line. Provide your phone number and assure the customer that you are committed to ensuring their satisfaction. Be sure to provide a solid solution. IE: I am the manger and will be there at 11am – 9pm and I look forward to taking your call, or please message us your phone number and we will contact you asap – and do it! 

#3 – Do not remove the post. It’s a knee-jerk reaction and we all want to do it. You are mad and you probably want to hide it from all of your other customers that love you. But, sometimes if your customers that love you see it, this can work in your favor. How? Because they LOVE you and will have a hard time believing that you could do any wrong. And our favorites are the ones that are not shy about saying it publically. We had a complaint about the ‘high’ price of a fish sandwich on a restaurant client’s page. We saw it and responded nicely about quality ingredients, etc., etc. Shortly thereafter, several posts following it from some of their fans, in summary, said ‘you get what you pay for and if you don’t like it, go down the street to Burger King and get yourself a .99 fish sandwich. We didn’t say (although we may have been thinking it), it was our customers.

#4 – You may have to delete and ban a user. If you have tried all of the above, and they are relentlessly posting negative feedback (and maybe even using profanity), and you are confident that even if you offered them a million dollars and a stake in your company, they wouldn’t stop, then delete their post and ban them. That’s right, I said it, get rid of them! We had to do it with someone that, with a little research, found out that he was a serial negative poster about many things, and he was also a professional con-artist (with some pending law suits). He was just interested in what he could get for free. And in the end, he got nothing.

Tell us about your best or worse negative social media post. Did you convert the customer to one of your biggest fans, or did you ban them for eternity?

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0

Twitter's New Layout - April 2014

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 12 April 2014 in social media

The Top 3 Things to Know About Twitter's New Layout

Plus more!

Yes, it looks very similar to Facebook, which many new and future Twitter users may like. The jury is still out on what frequent Twitter users think, they may not like the 'commercialization' of the new look, a quick Google search, and you will find a lot of blogs talking about it (like this one!). When we speak to business owners, many are not sure how Twitter works or what a hashtag (#) is used for, so I think this new, familiar look will help potential users feel more comfortable using the site.

The major differences:

1. Large cover image at the top vs a smaller header for picture - 1,500 x 500 pixels wide vs 1252 x 626. Yes, you will need to create a new image otherwise, it will look stretched.

twitter copy

2. More popular tweets are a larger font to make it easy for your followers to see and find vs the same font for every tweet

mo

3. Larger profile images vs all the same size

Larger Twitter pictures

Some other notible Twitter changes:

  • Pin Tweets: You can now "Pin" a tweet (again, similar to Facebook). Just click on the More menu in every tweet (those three dots), and select "Pin to your profile page".
  • "Who to Follow" and "Trends" have moved to the lower right. The popular "trends" list has moved to the bottom right side of your Twitter profile (use to be on the left side).
  • Twitter's "Edit Profile" screen is completely new and improved from previous versions.
  • See detailed description of who you’re following on Twitter, you will see a tiled board (similar to Pinterest) that includes not only the names of everyone you’re following but their profile picture, header photo and bio.
  • The menu of Tweets, Following, Followers, Favorites and Lists are gone. When you post a photo or video, the small checkerboard square of media elements will reappear below your profile picture and description.
  • Twitter will now have pop-up notifications in your web browser anytime someone has replied to, favorited or retweeted one of your tweets while you’re logged into Twitter.com.

Let us know what you think of Twitter's new redesign. Do you like everything? Do you like a few things? Do you like it all?

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0

New Facebook Insight's Changes

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 13 July 2013 in social media
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0

Facebook's New Layout as of August, 2016

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Thursday, 04 August 2016 in social media

 

New Facebook layout

Facebook has been testing and has now rolled out a new business page layout. I first noticed it when I was logged into a client's Facebook account a couple of weeks ago in July. They were just showing the new look to a select audience because when I logged into my account, I was not seeing the new look quite yet.

Here are the changes that we see to the new Facebook look as of August 3rd, 2016:

1) The Facebook profile picture has moved to the top left and looks a little larger (thank goodness it's not blocking the Facebook cover image anymore!).

2) The Facebook cover image is now fully exposed! Designers will not have to worry about designing the Facebook cover image around any copy or profile pictures.

3) The information buttons, including about us, photos, videos, notes, etc. tabs are now to the left of the page, vs below the cover image.

4) The 'promote' button has moved to the bottom left under the information buttons.

5) The 'write something' for your business' status report is located in the middle of the page.

6) The Like, Message, More and call to action button such as 'Visit Website' are now more prominent and no longer crammed onto the bottom of the cover image (again, not blocking anything on the cover image). They are now located directly under the Facebook cover image.

7) The search button that was at the top of the page has been moved to the right under category, city, your average Facebook review, and the status of your business hours.

8) The Insights snapshot with post reach, the number of people that have clicked on your website, and the number of people that have clicked your call to action button is prominent in the top middle of the main timeline area.

9) The column that was on the left is now on the right hand side of the page and includes response rate, number of likes, check-ins, map, contact information, apps, photos, videos, upcoming events, notes and visitor posts.

BB FB

Overall, I like the new look. Facebook has to keep evolving and changing with so many other new social networks nipping at their heels. No doubt, there will be a backlash from users, but I personally think the new look will be easy to get use to. It will certainly keep our graphic designer busy  redesigning cover images to include images and copy where you would like now!

Tags: Array
0

Not only did Muhammad Ali know a thing or two about boxing, he was a champion of his brand, too. I instructed a class last week on ‘Making the Most Out of LinkedIn for Your Personal Brand.’ If LinkedIn were around when Muhammad Ali was in his prime, his description might read something like: ‘Self-proclaimed greatest boxer of all time. Entertaining audiences globally for over a decade.’ Well, you get the idea.

My LinkedIn branding class not only encouraged students to maximize all the categories LinkedIn offers to describe yourself, but also to provide a detailed, engaging, and yes, in some ways, entertaining description of you and your career. I reminded attendees that your online brand is the ‘first digital impression’ of you before someone meets you in person (or IRL=In Real Life) – and haven’t we all done an internet search on someone before we meet them, do business with them, or even accept their connection request on LinkedIn?

“Float Like a Butterfly…” Ali’s personal tag line is so well branded that I bet you can finish it without my help. Think about applying Ali’s branding techniques to your personal brand. Are you the best in your business? How can you convey, maybe in a more subtle way than Ali did, why someone should believe in you and your brand, want to get to know you better, or want to do business with you? Here are five things to think about to make the most out of your personal brand: 

1 – Think. Take a moment to think about what you want to be known for…. Got it? Now own it. If it’s not boxing (or maybe it is), what do you want people to think or say about you when you leave the room? For example: “He’s the most entertaining boxer I’ve ever seen and I would pay to see him again anytime!” Think about what you want people to say about you when you're not there.

2 – Craft. Next, now that you've thought about what you want to be known for, take time to create an authentic, descriptive, and again, maybe even entertaining, summary of yourself. Does it lead someone to want to read more about you? Does it summarize your successes? For example: “Olympic gold medal winner known for putting boxing on the map and dominating the spot for over two decades.” I immediately think – wow, how did he do that? I want to continue reading to find out!

3 – Be the Champ. Now that you have a winning summary of yourself, figure out what makes you different. What makes you the best at what you do? For example: “First man to win a heavyweight boxing title three times. Career-ending 56-5 record, with 37 knockouts, and lifetime earnings of $57 million.” Well, you don’t have to include your career earnings, but it sure sounded good in this example. Take the proverbial bull by the horns and own the title of best in your industry. Be prepared to prove it. Customer testimonials are a great way to help prove how good you are and they sound much better than you saying how fab you are – unless of course you are Muhammad Ali.

4 – Trail blaze. Now that you've figured out what makes you a champ, you need to share your forward-thinking ideas with others. Ali was known for speaking his mind (albeit a bit controversial at times), but I would encourage you to be a thought-leader in your industry. Take time each week to think about how you can help others – your customers and future customers – where your industry is headed, etc., and put it in writing. Start a blog, post it on your social networks, and even launch a podcast (read The Rising Popularity of Podcasting, and Why Your Business Should Care http://blogs.constantcontact.com/podcasting)

5 – Make a Difference. Lastly, highlight what are you doing to make the world a better place (ever heard of good karma?). Some of the students graduating from high school and college are so smart – over 4.0 GPA’s (don’t ask me how you earn over a 4.0 GPA, I preferred to socialize a bit more than study too hard – just ask my parents). What is going to be the tipping point of an employer when they are looking at two resumes with identical grades? Their social consciousness (and they have it - a 2014 millennial impact report showed 92% of millennials are contributing their creative skills to companies they feel are making a difference in the world). Find out what you are passionate about and donate your time, talents and/or treasures. Ali was an inspiration to the young, recognized for his race relations, humanitarianism, and standing up for what he believed in, even when the consequences were great. He fought for truth and justice. What will you fight for?

Let us know your thoughts on being the champ in your industry below!

b2ap3_thumbnail_cindy-flower-by-tree.jpg

 

 

 

Cindy Dalecki is owner of Marketing 2 Go, a social media, branding and marketing firm located in Palm Coast, Florida. 

Tags: Array
0

Using Video to Promote Your Business

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Sunday, 28 December 2014 in social media

They are watched for entertainment, and education, cooking tips and recipes, you can learn how to put something together (or take it apart), how to change your oil or change a diaper, movie trailers, and so much more. So why wouldn't you use video to promote your business? The answer is, you absolutely should be using video to further and strengthen your brand and company. I don't mean that you have to be in a video and talk about how great your company is, I mean you should utilize video the way you consume video. Here are five different ideas on how to get started using video for your business:

1. Stay out of it. Everyone knows that the best form of advertising is 'word of mouth' (WOM), so why not ask your customers to talk about how wonderful you are? A third party endorsement is better than anything you could say about how great you are. Tip: Hire someone to capture these videos for you since it may be awkward for someone to say how great you are to you. You will be pleasantly surprised what amazing things your fans say about you!

2. You are the pro. I know I just said ‘stay out of it’, but that was just one suggestion. Not only should promote what other 'experts' are saying in your industry, but if you are experienced at what you do, and consider yourself an expert, we recommend you share your knowledge with others. Remember, it's for the greater good of your business. Your goal is to create a reputation about your business as the industry experts. I'm not suggesting giving away trade secrets of course, but sharing answers to questions that you get all the time, or helpful or trending topics you read about in an industry magazine.

3. Promote your cause marketing. Cause marketing is aligning yourself with your favorite non-profit with the goal of positive, mutually beneficial results. This means, helping get the word out about your charity and their event, fundraiser, cause, mission, etc. In your effort to help them, people will inadvertently feel good about your business because they now see you as a business that cares about their community. And if you have a video about the non-profit, they are more likely to post it on their social networks (be sure to ask them to do so) and it will be exposed to their network of followers.

4. Ask fans to share a video of themselves using your product, or how they best utilize your service. Again, what better way to capture third party endorsements? Don’t forget to offer a prize to the most popular video.

woodys

5. Highlight your team. Ask select staff to introduce themselves and give a tip to your customers that will help them better utilize your products or services. Fans will enjoy seeing their favorite workers online and getting to know them before they do business with you. You or your team can also record short videos to promote upcoming events and provide a ‘behind the scenes’ look at your business.

What other ways have you successfully used video to reach out to your fans and potential new customers? We havehad success utilizing video for restaurants to promote events, heart-felt customer testimonials for a long-standing heating and air conditioning company, real estate agent branding campaigns and more.

Tags: Array
0

It's one of the biggest fears our potential clients (notice, they are not social media clients yet), and a reason that many county and city decision makers, business owners and managers do not take the necessary leap into social media...because someone could write something negative about my business on there! Well, guess what, they very well may be doing it already and you have no control over it and worse yet, don't know that it's out there...lurking...waiting to haunt you...(Halloween is next week you know).

Ask yourself this, wouldn't it be better to have the ability to hear from an uphappy customer, be able to respond publically to them, and finally, make it better? You know your business best so think about this: In the past, what have been some of the complaints about your busienss? Have you been able to fix them? We are guessing you have. And I am willing to bet that some of those clients  that originally were unhappy about (probably) something silly, and you paid them extra attenion, fixed it, and maybe even made it better, are one of your best word-of-mouth (WOM) promoters now. 

I organized an entrepreneur panel for the Flagler County Chamber of Commerce breakfast last year. One of the audience members asked the question: "How do you avoid someone posting something negative on your page". One of the panel member’s answer was priceless: "Be fabulous at what you do and you don't have to worry about that so much" (props to Kayhan Ekinci at Office Divvy). Yes, if you provide exceptional customer service, it's true that the likelihood of negative comments goes way down. But in reality, we know that you can't please everyone, all the time (some people are clinically off their meds, we understand). So what do you do? 

#1 - Monitor what is being said about you or your business. Set up Google alerts (or something similar), if you are a local business, for goodness sake, read or subscribe to the online version of the newspaper (there's nothing worse than someone saying - did you see that article? You didn’t and it was about you!).

#2 - Respond immediately. If you are a restaurant and it’s a complaint about service, find out who was working and get their side of the story (the truth will be in the middle somewhere). Take the conversation off-line. Provide your phone number and assure the customer that you are committed to ensuring their satisfaction. Be sure to provide a solid solution. IE: I am the manger and will be there at 11am – 9pm and I look forward to taking your call, or please message us your phone number and we will contact you asap – and do it! 

#3 – Do not remove the post. It’s a knee-jerk reaction and we all want to do it. You are mad and you probably want to hide it from all of your other customers that love you. But, sometimes if your customers that love you see it, this can work in your favor. How? Because they LOVE you and will have a hard time believing that you could do any wrong. And our favorites are the ones that are not shy about saying it publically. We had a complaint about the ‘high’ price of a fish sandwich on a restaurant client’s page. We saw it and responded nicely about quality ingredients, etc., etc. Shortly thereafter, several posts following it from some of their fans, in summary, said ‘you get what you pay for and if you don’t like it, go down the street to Burger King and get yourself a .99 fish sandwich. We didn’t say (although we may have been thinking it), it was our customers.

#4 – You may have to delete and ban a user. If you have tried all of the above, and they are relentlessly posting negative feedback (and maybe even using profanity), and you are confident that even if you offered them a million dollars and a stake in your company, they wouldn’t stop, then delete their post and ban them. That’s right, I said it, get rid of them! We had to do it with someone that, with a little research, found out that he was a serial negative poster about many things, and he was also a professional con-artist (with some pending law suits). He was just interested in what he could get for free. And in the end, he got nothing.

Tell us about your best or worse negative social media post. Did you convert the customer to one of your biggest fans, or did you ban them for eternity?

Tags: Array
0

Twitter's New Layout - April 2014

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 12 April 2014 in social media

The Top 3 Things to Know About Twitter's New Layout

Plus more!

Yes, it looks very similar to Facebook, which many new and future Twitter users may like. The jury is still out on what frequent Twitter users think, they may not like the 'commercialization' of the new look, a quick Google search, and you will find a lot of blogs talking about it (like this one!). When we speak to business owners, many are not sure how Twitter works or what a hashtag (#) is used for, so I think this new, familiar look will help potential users feel more comfortable using the site.

The major differences:

1. Large cover image at the top vs a smaller header for picture - 1,500 x 500 pixels wide vs 1252 x 626. Yes, you will need to create a new image otherwise, it will look stretched.

twitter copy

2. More popular tweets are a larger font to make it easy for your followers to see and find vs the same font for every tweet

mo

3. Larger profile images vs all the same size

Larger Twitter pictures

Some other notible Twitter changes:

  • Pin Tweets: You can now "Pin" a tweet (again, similar to Facebook). Just click on the More menu in every tweet (those three dots), and select "Pin to your profile page".
  • "Who to Follow" and "Trends" have moved to the lower right. The popular "trends" list has moved to the bottom right side of your Twitter profile (use to be on the left side).
  • Twitter's "Edit Profile" screen is completely new and improved from previous versions.
  • See detailed description of who you’re following on Twitter, you will see a tiled board (similar to Pinterest) that includes not only the names of everyone you’re following but their profile picture, header photo and bio.
  • The menu of Tweets, Following, Followers, Favorites and Lists are gone. When you post a photo or video, the small checkerboard square of media elements will reappear below your profile picture and description.
  • Twitter will now have pop-up notifications in your web browser anytime someone has replied to, favorited or retweeted one of your tweets while you’re logged into Twitter.com.

Let us know what you think of Twitter's new redesign. Do you like everything? Do you like a few things? Do you like it all?

Tags: Array
0

New Facebook Insight's Changes

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 13 July 2013 in social media
Tags: Array
0

Facebook's New Layout as of August, 2016

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Thursday, 04 August 2016 in social media

 

New Facebook layout

Facebook has been testing and has now rolled out a new business page layout. I first noticed it when I was logged into a client's Facebook account a couple of weeks ago in July. They were just showing the new look to a select audience because when I logged into my account, I was not seeing the new look quite yet.

Here are the changes that we see to the new Facebook look as of August 3rd, 2016:

1) The Facebook profile picture has moved to the top left and looks a little larger (thank goodness it's not blocking the Facebook cover image anymore!).

2) The Facebook cover image is now fully exposed! Designers will not have to worry about designing the Facebook cover image around any copy or profile pictures.

3) The information buttons, including about us, photos, videos, notes, etc. tabs are now to the left of the page, vs below the cover image.

4) The 'promote' button has moved to the bottom left under the information buttons.

5) The 'write something' for your business' status report is located in the middle of the page.

6) The Like, Message, More and call to action button such as 'Visit Website' are now more prominent and no longer crammed onto the bottom of the cover image (again, not blocking anything on the cover image). They are now located directly under the Facebook cover image.

7) The search button that was at the top of the page has been moved to the right under category, city, your average Facebook review, and the status of your business hours.

8) The Insights snapshot with post reach, the number of people that have clicked on your website, and the number of people that have clicked your call to action button is prominent in the top middle of the main timeline area.

9) The column that was on the left is now on the right hand side of the page and includes response rate, number of likes, check-ins, map, contact information, apps, photos, videos, upcoming events, notes and visitor posts.

BB FB

Overall, I like the new look. Facebook has to keep evolving and changing with so many other new social networks nipping at their heels. No doubt, there will be a backlash from users, but I personally think the new look will be easy to get use to. It will certainly keep our graphic designer busy  redesigning cover images to include images and copy where you would like now!

Tags: Array
0

Not only did Muhammad Ali know a thing or two about boxing, he was a champion of his brand, too. I instructed a class last week on ‘Making the Most Out of LinkedIn for Your Personal Brand.’ If LinkedIn were around when Muhammad Ali was in his prime, his description might read something like: ‘Self-proclaimed greatest boxer of all time. Entertaining audiences globally for over a decade.’ Well, you get the idea.

My LinkedIn branding class not only encouraged students to maximize all the categories LinkedIn offers to describe yourself, but also to provide a detailed, engaging, and yes, in some ways, entertaining description of you and your career. I reminded attendees that your online brand is the ‘first digital impression’ of you before someone meets you in person (or IRL=In Real Life) – and haven’t we all done an internet search on someone before we meet them, do business with them, or even accept their connection request on LinkedIn?

“Float Like a Butterfly…” Ali’s personal tag line is so well branded that I bet you can finish it without my help. Think about applying Ali’s branding techniques to your personal brand. Are you the best in your business? How can you convey, maybe in a more subtle way than Ali did, why someone should believe in you and your brand, want to get to know you better, or want to do business with you? Here are five things to think about to make the most out of your personal brand: 

1 – Think. Take a moment to think about what you want to be known for…. Got it? Now own it. If it’s not boxing (or maybe it is), what do you want people to think or say about you when you leave the room? For example: “He’s the most entertaining boxer I’ve ever seen and I would pay to see him again anytime!” Think about what you want people to say about you when you're not there.

2 – Craft. Next, now that you've thought about what you want to be known for, take time to create an authentic, descriptive, and again, maybe even entertaining, summary of yourself. Does it lead someone to want to read more about you? Does it summarize your successes? For example: “Olympic gold medal winner known for putting boxing on the map and dominating the spot for over two decades.” I immediately think – wow, how did he do that? I want to continue reading to find out!

3 – Be the Champ. Now that you have a winning summary of yourself, figure out what makes you different. What makes you the best at what you do? For example: “First man to win a heavyweight boxing title three times. Career-ending 56-5 record, with 37 knockouts, and lifetime earnings of $57 million.” Well, you don’t have to include your career earnings, but it sure sounded good in this example. Take the proverbial bull by the horns and own the title of best in your industry. Be prepared to prove it. Customer testimonials are a great way to help prove how good you are and they sound much better than you saying how fab you are – unless of course you are Muhammad Ali.

4 – Trail blaze. Now that you've figured out what makes you a champ, you need to share your forward-thinking ideas with others. Ali was known for speaking his mind (albeit a bit controversial at times), but I would encourage you to be a thought-leader in your industry. Take time each week to think about how you can help others – your customers and future customers – where your industry is headed, etc., and put it in writing. Start a blog, post it on your social networks, and even launch a podcast (read The Rising Popularity of Podcasting, and Why Your Business Should Care http://blogs.constantcontact.com/podcasting)

5 – Make a Difference. Lastly, highlight what are you doing to make the world a better place (ever heard of good karma?). Some of the students graduating from high school and college are so smart – over 4.0 GPA’s (don’t ask me how you earn over a 4.0 GPA, I preferred to socialize a bit more than study too hard – just ask my parents). What is going to be the tipping point of an employer when they are looking at two resumes with identical grades? Their social consciousness (and they have it - a 2014 millennial impact report showed 92% of millennials are contributing their creative skills to companies they feel are making a difference in the world). Find out what you are passionate about and donate your time, talents and/or treasures. Ali was an inspiration to the young, recognized for his race relations, humanitarianism, and standing up for what he believed in, even when the consequences were great. He fought for truth and justice. What will you fight for?

Let us know your thoughts on being the champ in your industry below!

b2ap3_thumbnail_cindy-flower-by-tree.jpg

 

 

 

Cindy Dalecki is owner of Marketing 2 Go, a social media, branding and marketing firm located in Palm Coast, Florida. 

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0

Using Video to Promote Your Business

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Sunday, 28 December 2014 in social media

They are watched for entertainment, and education, cooking tips and recipes, you can learn how to put something together (or take it apart), how to change your oil or change a diaper, movie trailers, and so much more. So why wouldn't you use video to promote your business? The answer is, you absolutely should be using video to further and strengthen your brand and company. I don't mean that you have to be in a video and talk about how great your company is, I mean you should utilize video the way you consume video. Here are five different ideas on how to get started using video for your business:

1. Stay out of it. Everyone knows that the best form of advertising is 'word of mouth' (WOM), so why not ask your customers to talk about how wonderful you are? A third party endorsement is better than anything you could say about how great you are. Tip: Hire someone to capture these videos for you since it may be awkward for someone to say how great you are to you. You will be pleasantly surprised what amazing things your fans say about you!

2. You are the pro. I know I just said ‘stay out of it’, but that was just one suggestion. Not only should promote what other 'experts' are saying in your industry, but if you are experienced at what you do, and consider yourself an expert, we recommend you share your knowledge with others. Remember, it's for the greater good of your business. Your goal is to create a reputation about your business as the industry experts. I'm not suggesting giving away trade secrets of course, but sharing answers to questions that you get all the time, or helpful or trending topics you read about in an industry magazine.

3. Promote your cause marketing. Cause marketing is aligning yourself with your favorite non-profit with the goal of positive, mutually beneficial results. This means, helping get the word out about your charity and their event, fundraiser, cause, mission, etc. In your effort to help them, people will inadvertently feel good about your business because they now see you as a business that cares about their community. And if you have a video about the non-profit, they are more likely to post it on their social networks (be sure to ask them to do so) and it will be exposed to their network of followers.

4. Ask fans to share a video of themselves using your product, or how they best utilize your service. Again, what better way to capture third party endorsements? Don’t forget to offer a prize to the most popular video.

woodys

5. Highlight your team. Ask select staff to introduce themselves and give a tip to your customers that will help them better utilize your products or services. Fans will enjoy seeing their favorite workers online and getting to know them before they do business with you. You or your team can also record short videos to promote upcoming events and provide a ‘behind the scenes’ look at your business.

What other ways have you successfully used video to reach out to your fans and potential new customers? We havehad success utilizing video for restaurants to promote events, heart-felt customer testimonials for a long-standing heating and air conditioning company, real estate agent branding campaigns and more.

Tags: Array
0

It's one of the biggest fears our potential clients (notice, they are not social media clients yet), and a reason that many county and city decision makers, business owners and managers do not take the necessary leap into social media...because someone could write something negative about my business on there! Well, guess what, they very well may be doing it already and you have no control over it and worse yet, don't know that it's out there...lurking...waiting to haunt you...(Halloween is next week you know).

Ask yourself this, wouldn't it be better to have the ability to hear from an uphappy customer, be able to respond publically to them, and finally, make it better? You know your business best so think about this: In the past, what have been some of the complaints about your busienss? Have you been able to fix them? We are guessing you have. And I am willing to bet that some of those clients  that originally were unhappy about (probably) something silly, and you paid them extra attenion, fixed it, and maybe even made it better, are one of your best word-of-mouth (WOM) promoters now. 

I organized an entrepreneur panel for the Flagler County Chamber of Commerce breakfast last year. One of the audience members asked the question: "How do you avoid someone posting something negative on your page". One of the panel member’s answer was priceless: "Be fabulous at what you do and you don't have to worry about that so much" (props to Kayhan Ekinci at Office Divvy). Yes, if you provide exceptional customer service, it's true that the likelihood of negative comments goes way down. But in reality, we know that you can't please everyone, all the time (some people are clinically off their meds, we understand). So what do you do? 

#1 - Monitor what is being said about you or your business. Set up Google alerts (or something similar), if you are a local business, for goodness sake, read or subscribe to the online version of the newspaper (there's nothing worse than someone saying - did you see that article? You didn’t and it was about you!).

#2 - Respond immediately. If you are a restaurant and it’s a complaint about service, find out who was working and get their side of the story (the truth will be in the middle somewhere). Take the conversation off-line. Provide your phone number and assure the customer that you are committed to ensuring their satisfaction. Be sure to provide a solid solution. IE: I am the manger and will be there at 11am – 9pm and I look forward to taking your call, or please message us your phone number and we will contact you asap – and do it! 

#3 – Do not remove the post. It’s a knee-jerk reaction and we all want to do it. You are mad and you probably want to hide it from all of your other customers that love you. But, sometimes if your customers that love you see it, this can work in your favor. How? Because they LOVE you and will have a hard time believing that you could do any wrong. And our favorites are the ones that are not shy about saying it publically. We had a complaint about the ‘high’ price of a fish sandwich on a restaurant client’s page. We saw it and responded nicely about quality ingredients, etc., etc. Shortly thereafter, several posts following it from some of their fans, in summary, said ‘you get what you pay for and if you don’t like it, go down the street to Burger King and get yourself a .99 fish sandwich. We didn’t say (although we may have been thinking it), it was our customers.

#4 – You may have to delete and ban a user. If you have tried all of the above, and they are relentlessly posting negative feedback (and maybe even using profanity), and you are confident that even if you offered them a million dollars and a stake in your company, they wouldn’t stop, then delete their post and ban them. That’s right, I said it, get rid of them! We had to do it with someone that, with a little research, found out that he was a serial negative poster about many things, and he was also a professional con-artist (with some pending law suits). He was just interested in what he could get for free. And in the end, he got nothing.

Tell us about your best or worse negative social media post. Did you convert the customer to one of your biggest fans, or did you ban them for eternity?

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0

Twitter's New Layout - April 2014

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 12 April 2014 in social media

The Top 3 Things to Know About Twitter's New Layout

Plus more!

Yes, it looks very similar to Facebook, which many new and future Twitter users may like. The jury is still out on what frequent Twitter users think, they may not like the 'commercialization' of the new look, a quick Google search, and you will find a lot of blogs talking about it (like this one!). When we speak to business owners, many are not sure how Twitter works or what a hashtag (#) is used for, so I think this new, familiar look will help potential users feel more comfortable using the site.

The major differences:

1. Large cover image at the top vs a smaller header for picture - 1,500 x 500 pixels wide vs 1252 x 626. Yes, you will need to create a new image otherwise, it will look stretched.

twitter copy

2. More popular tweets are a larger font to make it easy for your followers to see and find vs the same font for every tweet

mo

3. Larger profile images vs all the same size

Larger Twitter pictures

Some other notible Twitter changes:

  • Pin Tweets: You can now "Pin" a tweet (again, similar to Facebook). Just click on the More menu in every tweet (those three dots), and select "Pin to your profile page".
  • "Who to Follow" and "Trends" have moved to the lower right. The popular "trends" list has moved to the bottom right side of your Twitter profile (use to be on the left side).
  • Twitter's "Edit Profile" screen is completely new and improved from previous versions.
  • See detailed description of who you’re following on Twitter, you will see a tiled board (similar to Pinterest) that includes not only the names of everyone you’re following but their profile picture, header photo and bio.
  • The menu of Tweets, Following, Followers, Favorites and Lists are gone. When you post a photo or video, the small checkerboard square of media elements will reappear below your profile picture and description.
  • Twitter will now have pop-up notifications in your web browser anytime someone has replied to, favorited or retweeted one of your tweets while you’re logged into Twitter.com.

Let us know what you think of Twitter's new redesign. Do you like everything? Do you like a few things? Do you like it all?

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0

New Facebook Insight's Changes

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 13 July 2013 in social media
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0

Facebook's New Layout as of August, 2016

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Thursday, 04 August 2016 in social media

 

New Facebook layout

Facebook has been testing and has now rolled out a new business page layout. I first noticed it when I was logged into a client's Facebook account a couple of weeks ago in July. They were just showing the new look to a select audience because when I logged into my account, I was not seeing the new look quite yet.

Here are the changes that we see to the new Facebook look as of August 3rd, 2016:

1) The Facebook profile picture has moved to the top left and looks a little larger (thank goodness it's not blocking the Facebook cover image anymore!).

2) The Facebook cover image is now fully exposed! Designers will not have to worry about designing the Facebook cover image around any copy or profile pictures.

3) The information buttons, including about us, photos, videos, notes, etc. tabs are now to the left of the page, vs below the cover image.

4) The 'promote' button has moved to the bottom left under the information buttons.

5) The 'write something' for your business' status report is located in the middle of the page.

6) The Like, Message, More and call to action button such as 'Visit Website' are now more prominent and no longer crammed onto the bottom of the cover image (again, not blocking anything on the cover image). They are now located directly under the Facebook cover image.

7) The search button that was at the top of the page has been moved to the right under category, city, your average Facebook review, and the status of your business hours.

8) The Insights snapshot with post reach, the number of people that have clicked on your website, and the number of people that have clicked your call to action button is prominent in the top middle of the main timeline area.

9) The column that was on the left is now on the right hand side of the page and includes response rate, number of likes, check-ins, map, contact information, apps, photos, videos, upcoming events, notes and visitor posts.

BB FB

Overall, I like the new look. Facebook has to keep evolving and changing with so many other new social networks nipping at their heels. No doubt, there will be a backlash from users, but I personally think the new look will be easy to get use to. It will certainly keep our graphic designer busy  redesigning cover images to include images and copy where you would like now!

Tags: Array
0

Not only did Muhammad Ali know a thing or two about boxing, he was a champion of his brand, too. I instructed a class last week on ‘Making the Most Out of LinkedIn for Your Personal Brand.’ If LinkedIn were around when Muhammad Ali was in his prime, his description might read something like: ‘Self-proclaimed greatest boxer of all time. Entertaining audiences globally for over a decade.’ Well, you get the idea.

My LinkedIn branding class not only encouraged students to maximize all the categories LinkedIn offers to describe yourself, but also to provide a detailed, engaging, and yes, in some ways, entertaining description of you and your career. I reminded attendees that your online brand is the ‘first digital impression’ of you before someone meets you in person (or IRL=In Real Life) – and haven’t we all done an internet search on someone before we meet them, do business with them, or even accept their connection request on LinkedIn?

“Float Like a Butterfly…” Ali’s personal tag line is so well branded that I bet you can finish it without my help. Think about applying Ali’s branding techniques to your personal brand. Are you the best in your business? How can you convey, maybe in a more subtle way than Ali did, why someone should believe in you and your brand, want to get to know you better, or want to do business with you? Here are five things to think about to make the most out of your personal brand: 

1 – Think. Take a moment to think about what you want to be known for…. Got it? Now own it. If it’s not boxing (or maybe it is), what do you want people to think or say about you when you leave the room? For example: “He’s the most entertaining boxer I’ve ever seen and I would pay to see him again anytime!” Think about what you want people to say about you when you're not there.

2 – Craft. Next, now that you've thought about what you want to be known for, take time to create an authentic, descriptive, and again, maybe even entertaining, summary of yourself. Does it lead someone to want to read more about you? Does it summarize your successes? For example: “Olympic gold medal winner known for putting boxing on the map and dominating the spot for over two decades.” I immediately think – wow, how did he do that? I want to continue reading to find out!

3 – Be the Champ. Now that you have a winning summary of yourself, figure out what makes you different. What makes you the best at what you do? For example: “First man to win a heavyweight boxing title three times. Career-ending 56-5 record, with 37 knockouts, and lifetime earnings of $57 million.” Well, you don’t have to include your career earnings, but it sure sounded good in this example. Take the proverbial bull by the horns and own the title of best in your industry. Be prepared to prove it. Customer testimonials are a great way to help prove how good you are and they sound much better than you saying how fab you are – unless of course you are Muhammad Ali.

4 – Trail blaze. Now that you've figured out what makes you a champ, you need to share your forward-thinking ideas with others. Ali was known for speaking his mind (albeit a bit controversial at times), but I would encourage you to be a thought-leader in your industry. Take time each week to think about how you can help others – your customers and future customers – where your industry is headed, etc., and put it in writing. Start a blog, post it on your social networks, and even launch a podcast (read The Rising Popularity of Podcasting, and Why Your Business Should Care http://blogs.constantcontact.com/podcasting)

5 – Make a Difference. Lastly, highlight what are you doing to make the world a better place (ever heard of good karma?). Some of the students graduating from high school and college are so smart – over 4.0 GPA’s (don’t ask me how you earn over a 4.0 GPA, I preferred to socialize a bit more than study too hard – just ask my parents). What is going to be the tipping point of an employer when they are looking at two resumes with identical grades? Their social consciousness (and they have it - a 2014 millennial impact report showed 92% of millennials are contributing their creative skills to companies they feel are making a difference in the world). Find out what you are passionate about and donate your time, talents and/or treasures. Ali was an inspiration to the young, recognized for his race relations, humanitarianism, and standing up for what he believed in, even when the consequences were great. He fought for truth and justice. What will you fight for?

Let us know your thoughts on being the champ in your industry below!

b2ap3_thumbnail_cindy-flower-by-tree.jpg

 

 

 

Cindy Dalecki is owner of Marketing 2 Go, a social media, branding and marketing firm located in Palm Coast, Florida. 

Tags: Array
0

Using Video to Promote Your Business

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Sunday, 28 December 2014 in social media

They are watched for entertainment, and education, cooking tips and recipes, you can learn how to put something together (or take it apart), how to change your oil or change a diaper, movie trailers, and so much more. So why wouldn't you use video to promote your business? The answer is, you absolutely should be using video to further and strengthen your brand and company. I don't mean that you have to be in a video and talk about how great your company is, I mean you should utilize video the way you consume video. Here are five different ideas on how to get started using video for your business:

1. Stay out of it. Everyone knows that the best form of advertising is 'word of mouth' (WOM), so why not ask your customers to talk about how wonderful you are? A third party endorsement is better than anything you could say about how great you are. Tip: Hire someone to capture these videos for you since it may be awkward for someone to say how great you are to you. You will be pleasantly surprised what amazing things your fans say about you!

2. You are the pro. I know I just said ‘stay out of it’, but that was just one suggestion. Not only should promote what other 'experts' are saying in your industry, but if you are experienced at what you do, and consider yourself an expert, we recommend you share your knowledge with others. Remember, it's for the greater good of your business. Your goal is to create a reputation about your business as the industry experts. I'm not suggesting giving away trade secrets of course, but sharing answers to questions that you get all the time, or helpful or trending topics you read about in an industry magazine.

3. Promote your cause marketing. Cause marketing is aligning yourself with your favorite non-profit with the goal of positive, mutually beneficial results. This means, helping get the word out about your charity and their event, fundraiser, cause, mission, etc. In your effort to help them, people will inadvertently feel good about your business because they now see you as a business that cares about their community. And if you have a video about the non-profit, they are more likely to post it on their social networks (be sure to ask them to do so) and it will be exposed to their network of followers.

4. Ask fans to share a video of themselves using your product, or how they best utilize your service. Again, what better way to capture third party endorsements? Don’t forget to offer a prize to the most popular video.

woodys

5. Highlight your team. Ask select staff to introduce themselves and give a tip to your customers that will help them better utilize your products or services. Fans will enjoy seeing their favorite workers online and getting to know them before they do business with you. You or your team can also record short videos to promote upcoming events and provide a ‘behind the scenes’ look at your business.

What other ways have you successfully used video to reach out to your fans and potential new customers? We havehad success utilizing video for restaurants to promote events, heart-felt customer testimonials for a long-standing heating and air conditioning company, real estate agent branding campaigns and more.

Tags: Array
0

It's one of the biggest fears our potential clients (notice, they are not social media clients yet), and a reason that many county and city decision makers, business owners and managers do not take the necessary leap into social media...because someone could write something negative about my business on there! Well, guess what, they very well may be doing it already and you have no control over it and worse yet, don't know that it's out there...lurking...waiting to haunt you...(Halloween is next week you know).

Ask yourself this, wouldn't it be better to have the ability to hear from an uphappy customer, be able to respond publically to them, and finally, make it better? You know your business best so think about this: In the past, what have been some of the complaints about your busienss? Have you been able to fix them? We are guessing you have. And I am willing to bet that some of those clients  that originally were unhappy about (probably) something silly, and you paid them extra attenion, fixed it, and maybe even made it better, are one of your best word-of-mouth (WOM) promoters now. 

I organized an entrepreneur panel for the Flagler County Chamber of Commerce breakfast last year. One of the audience members asked the question: "How do you avoid someone posting something negative on your page". One of the panel member’s answer was priceless: "Be fabulous at what you do and you don't have to worry about that so much" (props to Kayhan Ekinci at Office Divvy). Yes, if you provide exceptional customer service, it's true that the likelihood of negative comments goes way down. But in reality, we know that you can't please everyone, all the time (some people are clinically off their meds, we understand). So what do you do? 

#1 - Monitor what is being said about you or your business. Set up Google alerts (or something similar), if you are a local business, for goodness sake, read or subscribe to the online version of the newspaper (there's nothing worse than someone saying - did you see that article? You didn’t and it was about you!).

#2 - Respond immediately. If you are a restaurant and it’s a complaint about service, find out who was working and get their side of the story (the truth will be in the middle somewhere). Take the conversation off-line. Provide your phone number and assure the customer that you are committed to ensuring their satisfaction. Be sure to provide a solid solution. IE: I am the manger and will be there at 11am – 9pm and I look forward to taking your call, or please message us your phone number and we will contact you asap – and do it! 

#3 – Do not remove the post. It’s a knee-jerk reaction and we all want to do it. You are mad and you probably want to hide it from all of your other customers that love you. But, sometimes if your customers that love you see it, this can work in your favor. How? Because they LOVE you and will have a hard time believing that you could do any wrong. And our favorites are the ones that are not shy about saying it publically. We had a complaint about the ‘high’ price of a fish sandwich on a restaurant client’s page. We saw it and responded nicely about quality ingredients, etc., etc. Shortly thereafter, several posts following it from some of their fans, in summary, said ‘you get what you pay for and if you don’t like it, go down the street to Burger King and get yourself a .99 fish sandwich. We didn’t say (although we may have been thinking it), it was our customers.

#4 – You may have to delete and ban a user. If you have tried all of the above, and they are relentlessly posting negative feedback (and maybe even using profanity), and you are confident that even if you offered them a million dollars and a stake in your company, they wouldn’t stop, then delete their post and ban them. That’s right, I said it, get rid of them! We had to do it with someone that, with a little research, found out that he was a serial negative poster about many things, and he was also a professional con-artist (with some pending law suits). He was just interested in what he could get for free. And in the end, he got nothing.

Tell us about your best or worse negative social media post. Did you convert the customer to one of your biggest fans, or did you ban them for eternity?

Tags: Array
0

Twitter's New Layout - April 2014

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 12 April 2014 in social media

The Top 3 Things to Know About Twitter's New Layout

Plus more!

Yes, it looks very similar to Facebook, which many new and future Twitter users may like. The jury is still out on what frequent Twitter users think, they may not like the 'commercialization' of the new look, a quick Google search, and you will find a lot of blogs talking about it (like this one!). When we speak to business owners, many are not sure how Twitter works or what a hashtag (#) is used for, so I think this new, familiar look will help potential users feel more comfortable using the site.

The major differences:

1. Large cover image at the top vs a smaller header for picture - 1,500 x 500 pixels wide vs 1252 x 626. Yes, you will need to create a new image otherwise, it will look stretched.

twitter copy

2. More popular tweets are a larger font to make it easy for your followers to see and find vs the same font for every tweet

mo

3. Larger profile images vs all the same size

Larger Twitter pictures

Some other notible Twitter changes:

  • Pin Tweets: You can now "Pin" a tweet (again, similar to Facebook). Just click on the More menu in every tweet (those three dots), and select "Pin to your profile page".
  • "Who to Follow" and "Trends" have moved to the lower right. The popular "trends" list has moved to the bottom right side of your Twitter profile (use to be on the left side).
  • Twitter's "Edit Profile" screen is completely new and improved from previous versions.
  • See detailed description of who you’re following on Twitter, you will see a tiled board (similar to Pinterest) that includes not only the names of everyone you’re following but their profile picture, header photo and bio.
  • The menu of Tweets, Following, Followers, Favorites and Lists are gone. When you post a photo or video, the small checkerboard square of media elements will reappear below your profile picture and description.
  • Twitter will now have pop-up notifications in your web browser anytime someone has replied to, favorited or retweeted one of your tweets while you’re logged into Twitter.com.

Let us know what you think of Twitter's new redesign. Do you like everything? Do you like a few things? Do you like it all?

Tags: Array
0

New Facebook Insight's Changes

Posted by Cindy Dalecki on Saturday, 13 July 2013 in social media
Tags: Array
0